Modern day workplace etiquette you should follow right now

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Smartphones and social media are awesome tools but they’ve definitely raised some questions when it comes to workplace manners. Do you answer that random email you received at 10:25 p.m.? Is it rude to ask to be removed from an extremely irrelevant email chain?  

If anyone knows how to navigate though these sticky social media webs, it's etiquette consultant Lisa Orr, who's offering answers to four common workplace tech etiquette issues right here: 

Are "read notices" OK to attach to work emails?

My preference is not to include a read notice which can feel invasive, but instead actually ask for a reply in your message if you need one. Expressions like “If you could please confirm receipt” are popular and they get right to the point without being so passive aggressive.

Can you ask to be taken off the frustratingly long work email chain that has become unrelated to work affairs?

Email chains should be banned. They are impossible to follow and rarely do what they were intended to do, which is to inform a large group about a shared update. It’s totally reasonable to ask for the email chain to cease.  Rather than take everyone on, ask the original email sender to shut it down and send out a note thanking people for replies. Explain that going forward they should reply directly, and not reply all and that unrelated chats should be taken offline. 

Do phrases like, "Sent from a mobile device - please excuse typos"  actually excuse typos?

They certainly don’t and my preference is not to have them.  At this point so many of us are using mobile devices almost exclusively to communicate that we’ve all become much more forgiving of typos, particularly in casual communication.  The reality is someone is going to read your typo before they read your excuse so if it’s a really unfortunate one, they probably won’t even bother reading to the end.

Is it OK to e-mail colleagues, asking for donations to a charity event?

I think it depends on how it’s done. The good part about a digital request is that people can choose to ignore it if they don’t want to support the cause, unlike the physical boxes of almonds, which were hard to ignore. The issue comes in when people are either aggressive or in a position of authority over you asking for support. It is never appropriate for you to feel pressured in the workplace to give money to co-workers regardless of the cause.

For more from Lisa, visit http://orretiquette.com/. Check out her whole interview in the video above.

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